Alloy Artifacts  

Lineman's Pliers


1801-6 6 Inch Lineman's Pliers

[Kraeuter 1801-6 6 Inch Lineman's Pliers]
Fig. 52. Kraeuter 1801-6 6 Inch Lineman's Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Back Side Detail, ca. Late 1910s to Early 1920s.

Fig. 52 shows a pair of Kraeuter 1801-6 6 inch lineman's pliers, stamped "Kraeuter" and "Made in U.S.A." over the pivot. The handles are also marked with "Forged Steel" forged into the underside, shown as a close-up in the lower inset.

The overall length is 6.3 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The upper inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the dimpled handle pattern with the central diamond.

The absence of a "Newark" marking and the older "Forged Steel" marking suggest production in the late 1910s to early 1920s.


1801-7 7 Inch Lineman's Pliers

[Kraeuter 1801-7 7 Inch Lineman's Pliers]
Fig. 53. Kraeuter 1801-7 7 Inch Lineman's Pliers, with Insets for Back Side, Side View and Marking Detail, ca. Mid 1920s to Mid 1930s.

Fig. 53 shows a pair of Kraeuter 1801-7 lineman's pliers, stamped with "Kraeuter" and the model number over the pivot, and with "Kraeuter U.S.A." forged into the underside of the handles (see lower inset).

The overall length is 7.2 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the Kraeuter "Don't Slip" gripping pattern on the handles. This design is covered by the Kraeuter 1914 patent #D46,682.

The 1925 Dunham, Carrigan Catalog illustrates this model with the older Dimple-Diamond handle pattern, but distributor catalogs don't always show up to date illustrations.

The "Kraeuter U.S.A." markings suggests production from the mid 1920s to mid 1930s.


1801-8½ 8.5 Inch Lineman's Pliers

[Kraeuter 1801-8½ 8.5 Inch Lineman's Pliers]
Fig. 54. Kraeuter 1801-8½ 8.5 Inch Lineman's Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1910-1921.

Fig. 54 shows an earlier pair of Kraeuter 1801-8½ lineman's pliers, stamped "Kraeuter & Co." and "Newark, N.J. U.S.A." over the pivot (see lower inset). A forged-in marking "Forged Steel" appears on the underside of the handles, as shown in the middle inset.

The overall length is 8.6 inches, and the finish is black oxide.

The upper inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the dimpled handle pattern with the central diamond.

[Kraeuter 1801-8½ Lineman's Pliers]
Fig. 55. Kraeuter 1801-8½ Lineman's Pliers, with Inset for Side View, ca. Mid 1940s to 1950s.

Fig. 55 shows a much later example of the Kraeuter 1801-8½ pliers, stamped with the company name and "USA" over the pivot.

The overall length is 8.4 inches, and the finish is black oxide.

The circular marking style indicates production from the mid 1940s onward.

By 1946 the model 1801 pliers were part of the "Industrial" line, with a simplified finish.


1831-6½ 6.5 Inch Lineman's or Electrician's Pliers

[Kraeuter 1831-6½ 6.5 Inch Lineman's Pliers]
Fig. 56. Kraeuter 1831-6½ 6.5 Inch Lineman's Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1910-1920.

Fig. 56 shows a pair of Kraeuter 1831-6½ 6.5 inch lineman's or electrician's pliers, marked "Kraeuter & Co." and "Newark, N.J. U.S.A." near the pivot, and with "Forged Steel" forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 6.6 inches, and the finish is black oxide.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, to illustrate the head design and handle pattern.

The dimpled handle with a raised diamond logo (called simply "knurled handles" in catalogs) is believed to be Kraeuter's earliest handle pattern.

This model was listed in the 1925 Dunham, Carrigan Catalog in nominal sizes of 4, 5, 6½, 7, and 8 inches, with the older Dimple-Diamond handle pattern. (Note though that illustrations in distributor catalogs may not be up to date.)


1831-7 7 Inch Lineman's Pliers

[Kraeuter 1831-7 7 Inch Lineman's Pliers]
Fig. 57. Kraeuter 1831-7 7 Inch Lineman's Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. Mid 1920s to Mid 1930s.

Fig. 57 shows a pair of Kraeuter 1831-7 7 inch lineman's pliers, stamped with "Kraeuter" and the model number near the pivot, and with "Kraeuter U.S.A." forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 7.2 inches, and the finish is black oxide.

The "Don't Slip" handle pattern and "Kraeuter U.S.A." marking on the underside of the handles suggest production from the mid 1920s to mid 1930s.


1831-8 "Supreme" 8 Inch Lineman's Pliers

[Kraeuter 1831-8 8 Inch Lineman's Pliers]
Fig. 58. Kraeuter 1831-8 8 Inch Lineman's Pliers, with Insets for Back Side and Side View, ca. Mid 1930s to 1938.

Fig. 58 shows a pair of Kraeuter 1831-8 "Supreme" 8 inch lineman's pliers, stamped "Supreme" with "Kraeuter" and the model number near the pivot, with "Made in U-S-A" on the back side.

The overall length is 8.0 inches, and the finish is black oxide.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the "Don't Slip" gripping pattern on the handles.

Note that the undersides of the handles are smooth, without a "Kraeuter U.S.A." marking.

The absence of the "Kraeuter U.S.A." marking and presence of the "Don't Slip" gripping pattern suggest production from the mid 1930s to 1938.


1834-6½ 6.5 Inch Lineman's Pliers

[Kraeuter 1834-6½ 6.5 Inch Lineman's Pliers]
Fig. 59. Kraeuter 1834-6½ 6.5 Inch Lineman's Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1910-1920.

Fig. 59 shows a pair of Kraeuter 1834-6½ 6.5 inch lineman's pliers, stamped "Kraeuter & Co." and "Newark, N.J. U.S.A." near the pivot, and with "Forged Steel" forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 6.5 inches, and the finish is nickel plating.


Early [2801-6] "Dreadnought" 6 Inch Lineman's Pliers

[Kraeuter Early 2801-6 Dreadnought 6 Inch Lineman's Pliers]
Fig. 60. Kraeuter Early [2801-6] "Dreadnought" 6 Inch Lineman's Pliers, with Insets for Back Side, Side View, and Marking Detail, ca. 1914.

Fig. 60 shows an early pair of Kraeuter [2801-6] "Dreadnought" 6 inch lineman's pliers, stamped with "Dreadnought" partially legible across the pivot, with "Kraeuter & Co." and "Newark, N.J. U.S.A." on the back side face. The handles of the pliers are marked with "Forged Nickel Steel" forged into the undersides (see lower right inset).

The overall length is 6.5 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The back side face is also stamped with a "Pat's Pending" patent notice, believed to be a reference to the Kraeuter 1914 design patent #D46,682 describing the "Don't Slip" gripping pattern on the handles.

This handle design was apparently first used for the model 2801 "Dreadnought" pliers, as a 1916 catalog from Central Auto Supply shows the 2801 pliers with the "Don't Slip" pattern, but other Kraeuter pliers with the older Dimple-Diamond pattern. (The listing from the catalog can be seen as the 1916 Catalog Listing for No. 2801 Pliers.)

The use of nickel steel in these 1914 pliers is currently our earliest reference to the usage of alloy steel in hand tools. Kraeuter's use of "Dreadnought" appears to have been intended as a brand denoting nickel alloy steel, as it was also used for nickel alloy chisels. However, "Dreadnought" is not known to have been registered as a trademark.


2801-7 "Dreadnought" 7 Inch Lineman's Pliers

The next two figures show two generations of the Kraeuter 2801 "Dreadnought" lineman's pliers in the 7 inch size.

[Kraeuter 2801-7 Dreadnought 7 Inch Lineman's Pliers]
Fig. 61. Kraeuter 2801-7 "Dreadnought" 7 Inch Lineman's Pliers, with Insets for Back Side, Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1914-1921.

Fig. 61 shows an earlier pair of Kraeuter 2801-7 "Dreadnought" 7 inch lineman's pliers, stamped "Dreadnought" and "Nickel Steel" over the pivot, with "Kraeuter & Co." and "Newark, N.J. U.S.A." below. The handles are also marked with "Forged Nickel Steel" forged into the undersides (see lower inset).

The overall length is 7.1 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The top inset shows the "Don't Slip" gripping pattern on the handles, a design covered by the Kraeuter 1914 patent #D46,682.

This handle design was actually first used for the 2801 "Dreadnought" pliers and appeared in catalogs as early as the 1916 (Central Auto Supply), a time when other Kraeuter plier models were using the older Dimple-Diamond pattern.

The "Newark" and "Forged Nickel Steel" markings with the "Don't Slip" gripping pattern suggest production in the range 1914-1921.

The Kraeuter "Dreadnought" pliers are notable as very early examples of the use of nickel alloy steel in hand tools.

[Kraeuter 2801-7 Dreadnought 7 Inch Lineman's Pliers]
Fig. 62. Kraeuter 2801-7 "Dreadnought" 7 Inch Lineman's Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Back Side Detail, ca. Mid 1920s to Mid 1930s.

Fig. 62 shows a later pair of Kraeuter 2801-7 "Dreadnought" 7 inch lineman's pliers, stamped "Dreadnought" and "Nickel Steel" over the pivot, and with "Kraeuter U.S.A." forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 7.1 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

These pliers have the Kraeuter "Don't Slip" gripping pattern on the handles, a design covered by the Kraeuter 1914 patent #D46,682.

This handle design was actually first used for the No. 2801 "Dreadnought" pliers and appeared in catalogs as early as the 1916 (Central Auto Supply), a time when other Kraeuter plier models were using the older Dimple-Diamond pattern.

The "Kraeuter U.S.A." marking suggests production from the mid 1920s to mid 1930s.


2801-8½ "Dreadnought" 8.5 Inch Lineman's Pliers

[Kraeuter 2801-8½ Dreadnought 8.5 Inch Lineman's Pliers]
Fig. 63A. Kraeuter 2801-8½ "Dreadnought" 8.5 Inch Lineman's Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Back Side Detail, ca. 1914 to 1921.

Fig. 63A shows a pair of Kraeuter 2801-8½ "Dreadnought" 8.5 inch lineman's pliers, stamped "Dreadnought" and "Nickel Steel" over the pivot, with "Kraeuter & Co." and "Newark, N.J. U.S.A." below. The handles are also marked with "Forged Nickel Steel" forged into the undersides.

The overall length is 8.5 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The top inset shows the "Don't Slip" gripping pattern on the handles, a design covered by the Kraeuter 1914 patent #D46,682.

This handle design was actually first used for the 2801 "Dreadnought" pliers and appeared in catalogs as early as the 1916 (Central Auto Supply), a time when other Kraeuter plier models were using the older Dimple-Diamond pattern.

The "Newark" and "Forged Nickel Steel" markings with the "Don't Slip" gripping pattern suggest production in the range 1914-1921.

The Kraeuter "Dreadnought" pliers are notable as very early examples of the use of nickel alloy steel in hand tools.


4801-8½ "Supreme" 8.5 Inch Lineman's Pliers

[Kraeuter 4801-8½ Supreme 8.5 Inch Lineman's Pliers]
Fig. 63B. Kraeuter 4801-8½ "Supreme" 8.5 Inch Lineman's Pliers, with Insets for Back Side, Side View, and Marking Detail, ca. Mid 1930s to 1938.

Fig. 63B shows a pair of Kraeuter 4801-8½ "Supreme" 8.5 inch lineman's pliers, stamped with "Kraeuter" and "Supreme" across the pivot.

The handles have a smooth underside, and one handle is stamped on the underside with a "9" (or "6") code.

The top inset shows the geometric gripping pattern on the handles, which is the "Beauty Handles" pattern described by the later 1921 design patent #D59,602.

The overall length is 8.6 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The absence of a "Kraeuter U.S.A." marking and the presence of the "Beauty Handles" pattern suggest production from the mid 1930s to 1938.

The model 4801 pliers were introduced in 1929 as the flagship of the "Supreme" line, a group of pliers selected to represent the pinnacle of quality in both utility and appearance. During the 1930s a number of other models were designated as "Supreme" within their functional category, and the available examples can be viewed together in the section on The "Supreme" Line.

The "Supreme" line wasn't fully documented until the 1946 catalog, and somewhat ironically the No. 4801 pliers had been discontinued by that time, leaving the older model 2801 pliers to be designated instead as the "Supreme" lineman's pliers.

As a side note, these fine pliers were acquired recently at a local flea market for a very modest $2 price. For any of our readers tired of paying inflated prices for used tools in online auctions, we'd suggest making a trip to a yard sale or flea market in your area. It's a pleasant way to spend a weekend morning or afternoon, and you may find some real bargains there.


1821 Series Universal Cutting Pliers

Kraeuter also produced a model 1821 series of "Universal Cutting" pliers with some similarities to the lineman's style. To earn their description, these pliers incorporated flat and rounded gripping surfaces, side cutters, Button's cutters, and awl/screwdriver tips on the handles. (Because of their similarities we have indexed the 1821 series as "Lineman's" pliers.)

The 1921 catalog offered the 1821 pliers in sizes 5½, 6½, 7½, and 8 inches.

This model appears to have been one of Kraeuter's favorites, as the 1821 pliers were one of the last models to retain the "Beauty Handles" gripping pattern.

The next figures show several generations of the Kraeuter 1821 pliers in various sizes, presented in roughly chronological order to show the evolution of features and handle patterns.


1821[-7½] 7.5 Inch Universal Cutting Pliers

[Kraeuter 1821 7.5 Inch Lineman's Universal Combination Pliers]
Fig. 64. Kraeuter 1821[-7½] 7.5 Inch Lineman's "Universal Combination" Pliers, with Insets for Side View, Construction, and Marking Detail, ca. Early to Mid 1910s.

Fig. 64 shows an early pair of the Kraeuter 1821[-7½] 7.5 inch lineman's "Universal Combination" pliers, incorporating flat and rounded gripping surfaces, side cutters, Button's cutters, and originally awl and screwdriver tips on the handles. (The handle tips have been broken off on this example.)

The pliers are stamped "Kraeuter & Co." near the pivot, with the likely "Newark, N.J. U.S.A." marking only partially visible.

The handles are also marked with "Forged Steel" forged into the underside, shown as a close-up in the lower inset.

The measured overall length is 6.6 inches, but with the handle tips the original length was likely 7.3 inches. The finish is plain steel, with extensive pitting due to rust.

These pliers were made with the "Dimple-Diamond" gripping pattern used by Kraeuter as its earlier handle pattern. The handle pattern is paired with a "Forged Steel" marking on the underside of the handles.

Note that these pliers were fitted with a limit pin, visible as the small circle obstructing the "RA" in the "KRAEUTER" marking. This pin was used to limit the opening of the pliers so that the Button's cutting slots come into alignment, although in this example the limit pin has been broken (or worn off) so that the pliers open fully. The limit pin feature was also noted on the Kraeuter Early 1821 Universal Combination Pliers shown in another figure.


[Kraeuter 1821 7.5 Inch Lineman's Universal Cutting Pliers]
Fig. 65. Kraeuter 1821[-7½] 7.5 Inch Universal Cutting Pliers, with Insets for Side View, Construction, and Marking Detail, ca. 1921.

Fig. 65 shows a somewhat later pair of the Kraeuter 1821[-7½] 7.5 inch universal cutting pliers, incorporating flat and rounded gripping surfaces, side cutters, Button's cutters, and an awl tip on the handle. (The other handle should have had a screwdriver tip, but it has been broken off or removed.)

The pliers are stamped "Kraeuter & Co." and "Newark, N.J. U.S.A." near the pivot, with the model number "No. 18??" only partially readable. The handles are also marked with "Forged Steel" forged into the underside.

The overall length is 7.3 inches, and the finish is polished steel.

The "Beauty Handles" pattern on these pliers is a geometric design similar to the Kraeuter "Don't Slip" pattern, but described by the later design patent #D59,602, filed by A.A. Kraeuter in 1920 and issued in 1921.

Our earliest reference to the No. 1821 pliers with the "Beauty Handles" gripping pattern is a Kraeuter catalog from around 1921. The handle pattern and older "Newark" marking on this example suggest production around 1921.


[Kraeuter 1821-7½ 7.5 Inch Universal Cutting Pliers]
Fig. 66. Kraeuter 1821-7½ 7.5 Inch Universal Cutting Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1921.

Fig. 66 shows another pair of the Kraeuter 1821-7½ 7.5 inch universal cutting pliers in better condition.

The pliers are stamped "Kraeuter & Co." and "Newark, N.J. U.S.A." near the pivot, with the model number as "No. 1821-7½" below (see middle inset).

The handles are also marked with "Forged Steel" forged into the underside, as shown in the lower inset.

The overall length is 7.3 inches, and the finish is polished steel.

The jaws incorporate both flat and rounded gripping surfaces, side cutters, and Button's cutting slots, and the handles include an awl tip and a screwdriver blade.

The "Beauty Handles" pattern on these pliers is a geometric design similar to the Kraeuter "Don't Slip" pattern, but described by the later design patent #D59,602, filed by A.A. Kraeuter in 1920 and issued in 1921.

Our earliest reference to the No. 1821 pliers with the "Beauty Handles" gripping pattern is a Kraeuter catalog from around 1921. The handle pattern and older "Newark" marking on this example suggest production around 1921.


1821-8 8 Inch Universal Cutting Pliers

[Kraeuter 1821-8 8 Inch Universal Cutting Pliers]
Fig. 67. Kraeuter 1821-8 8 Inch Universal Cutting Pliers, with Insets for Side View, Back Side Detail, and Marking Detail, ca. Early 1920s.

Fig. 67 shows a pair of the Kraeuter 1821-8 8 inch universal cutting pliers, stamped with "Kraeuter" and the model number across the pivot.

The handles are also marked with "Forged Steel" forged into the underside, as shown in the lower inset.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the "Beauty Handles" gripping pattern.

The overall length is 7.8 inches, and the finish is plain steel, with extensive pitting due to rust.

The "Beauty Handles" gripping pattern on these pliers is a variant of the "Don't Slip" pattern, described by the design patent #D59,602, filed by A.A. Kraeuter in 1920 and issued in 1921. Our earliest reference to the No. 1821 pliers with the "Beauty Handles" gripping pattern is a Kraeuter catalog from around 1921.

The presence of the "Forged Steel" marking and the absence of a "Newark" marking suggest production in the early 1920s.

The features of this model include both flat and rounded gripping surfaces, side cutters, Button's cutting slots, and awl and screwdriver tips on the handles.


1821-5½ 5.5 Inch Universal Cutting Pliers

[Kraeuter 1821-5½ 5.5 Inch Universal Cutting Pliers]
Fig. 68A. Kraeuter 1821-5½ 5.5 Inch Universal Cutting Pliers, with Insets for Side View, Construction, and Marking Detail, ca. Mid 1920s to Mid 1930s.

Fig. 68A shows a somewhat later pair of the Kraeuter 1821-5½ 5.5 inch universal cutting pliers, incorporating flat and rounded gripping surfaces, Button's cutters, and screwdriver and awl tips on the handles.

The pliers are marked with "Kraeuter" and the model number near the pivot, and with "Kraeuter U.S.A." forged into the underside of the handles.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the "Beauty Handles" gripping pattern.

The overall length is 5.5 inches, and the finish is polished steel, with some pitting due to rust.

The "Beauty Handles" pattern on these pliers is a 1921 variant of the familiar Kraeuter "Don't Slip" pattern, described by the later design patent #D59,602, filed by A.A. Kraeuter in 1920 and issued in 1921.

Our earliest reference to the No. 1821 pliers with the "Beauty Handles" gripping pattern is a Kraeuter catalog from around 1921. The 1929 Kraeuter catalog shows the No. 1821 pliers still retaining the "Beauty Handles" pattern, while most other models had been converted to the "Don't Slip" pattern. The handle pattern together with "Kraeuter U.S.A." on the underside suggest production from the mid 1920s to mid 1930s.


1821-6½ "Supreme" 6.5 Inch Universal Cutting Pliers

[Kraeuter 1821-6½ 6.5 Inch Universal Cutting Pliers]
Fig. 68B. Kraeuter 1821-6½ "Supreme" 6.5 Inch Universal Cutting Pliers, with Insets for Back Side and Side View, ca. Mid 1930s to 1938.

Fig. 68B shows a later pair of the Kraeuter 1821-6½ 6.5 inch universal cutting pliers, stamped with "Supreme" and "Kraeuter" plus the model number near the pivot, with "Made in U-S-A" on the back side.

The overall length is 6.4 inches, and the finish is black oxide.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the "Beauty Handles" gripping pattern on the handles.

Note that the undersides of the handles are smooth, without the "Kraeuter U.S.A." marking found on earlier generations.

The absence of a "Kraeuter U.S.A." marking and the presence of the "Beauty Handles" gripping pattern suggest production from the mid 1930s to 1938.


Button's Pattern Pliers

Button's Pattern pliers were a style of wire-cutters first introduced by J.M. King & Company in the late 1860s. These pliers were typically produced with two or three wire-cutting slots situated at the sides or between the jaws.

Button's pliers were very popular during the 19th century and remained in production through at least the mid 20th century.

Kraeuter's most popular Button's pliers were the No. 1841 series, which remained in production from around 1910 (or earlier) until at least the 1940s. The 1841 pliers were offered in sizes 6½, 8, and 10 inches.

The No. 1841 pliers had two distinctive production features generally not found in pliers from other makers, the first of which is that the cutting slot between the jaws was set perpendicular to the faces. Pliers from other makers (including the original J.M. King pliers) typically set the slot at an angle to the faces. This feature continued until around the mid to late 1940s, but later versions of the Kraeuter 1841 pliers have been observed with an angled slot.

The other distinctive Kraeuter feature is that the angled side facet of the head was ground with a curved surface, rather than the flat surface typically seen on other makes. The curve in this surface can be seen in the transition where the angled side facet meets the parallel sides of the head, appearing as a curved transition from dark to light in a side view of the pliers.

This feature is best illustrated in the top inset of the Kraeuter 1841-10 Button's Pliers, but is present in all known examples of this model series.

Our photographs in this section have been composed to illustrate the two distinctive features noted above, as these features will greatly assist in identifying contract production by Kraeuter.


Early 1841-6½ 6.5 Inch Button's Pattern Pliers

[Kraeuter 1841-6½ 6.5 Inch Button's Pattern Pliers]
Fig. 69. Kraeuter 1841-6½ 6.5 Inch Button's Pattern Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1910-1921.

Fig. 69 shows an early pair of Kraeuter 1841-6½ Button's Pattern pliers in the 6.5 inch size, stamped "Kraeuter & Co." and "Newark, N.J. U.S.A." near the pivot, and with "Forged Steel" forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 6.4 inches, and the finish is polished steel.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the "Dimple-Diamond" gripping pattern on the handles. This was the earliest handle pattern used by Kraeuter.

The middle left inset shows a close-up of the jaw construction, illustrating a detail peculiar to the Kraeuter Button's pliers. Note that the center cutting slot is oriented perpendicular to the faces of the pliers, in contrast to the slightly angled slot found on the original J.M. King Button pliers.


Early 1841-8 8 Inch Button's Pattern Pliers

The next two figures show examples of the 1841 "Button's Pattern" pliers.

[Kraeuter 1841-8 8 Inch Button's Pattern Pliers]
Fig. 70. Kraeuter 1841-8 8 Inch Button's Pattern Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1910-1921.

Fig. 70 shows an early pair of Kraeuter [1841] 8 inch "Button's Pattern" pliers, marked "Kraeuter & Co." near the pivot, and with "Forged Steel" forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 8.2 inches, and the finish is polished steel.

The handle pattern has a dimpled background with a central diamond, and the diamond is stamped with the Kraeuter "K" initial.

The model number is not marked on this early example, but these pliers are listed as Model 1841-8 "Button's Pattern" pliers in Kraeuter catalog No. 15 and others. The Button's design featured both flat and rounded gripping surfaces, plus three cutting notches at the sides and center.


[Kraeuter 1841-8 8 Inch Button's Pattern Pliers]
Fig. 71. Kraeuter 1841-8 8 Inch Button's Pattern Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1910-1921.

Fig. 71 shows another early example of the Kraeuter 1841-8 "Button's Pattern" pliers, marked "Kraeuter & Co." and "Newark, N.J. U.S.A." near the pivot (see lower inset), and with "Forged Steel" forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 8.2 inches, and the finish is polished steel.

The handle pattern has a dimpled background with a raised central diamond.


1841-10 10 Inch Button's Pattern Pliers

The next figures show two generations of the Kraeuter 1841 pliers in the 10 inch size.

[Kraeuter 1841-10 10 Inch Button's Pattern Pliers]
Fig. 72. Kraeuter 1841-10 10 Inch Button's Pattern Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Construction Detail, ca. 1910-1921.

Fig. 72 shows an earlier pair of Kraeuter 1841-10 10 inch "Button's Pattern" pliers, stamped with "Kraeuter & Co" and "Newark, N.J. U.S.A." near the pivot, and with "Forged Steel" forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 9.8 inches, and the finish is black oxide on polished steel.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the "Dimple-Diamond" gripping pattern on the handles. This was the earliest handle pattern used by Kraeuter.

The middle left inset shows a close-up of the jaw construction, illustrating a detail peculiar to the Kraeuter Button's pliers. Note that the center cutting slot is oriented at a right angle to the face of the pliers (parallel to the jaws), in contrast to the slightly angled slot found on the original J.M. King Button pliers.

[Kraeuter 1841-10 10 Inch Button's Pattern Pliers]
Fig. 73. Kraeuter 1841-10 10 Inch Button's Pattern Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Construction Detail, ca. Mid 1920s to Mid 1930s

Fig. 73 shows a later pair of Kraeuter 1841-10 10 inch "Button's Pattern" pliers, stamped with "Kraeuter" and the model number near the pivot, and with "Kraeuter U.S.A." forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 9.8 inches, and the finish is black oxide on polished steel.

These pliers have the Kraeuter "Don't Slip" gripping pattern on the handles, a design covered by the Kraeuter 1914 patent #D46,682.

The "Kraeuter U.S.A." markings suggests production from the mid 1920s to mid 1930s.

The middle inset shows a close-up of the jaw construction, illustrating a detail peculiar to the Kraeuter Button's pliers. Note that the center cutting slot is oriented at a right angle to the face of the pliers (parallel to the jaws), in contrast to the slightly angled slot found on the original J.M. King Button pliers.

The angled slot in the King pliers can be seen clearly in the J.M. King 8 Inch Button Pliers. Other makers of Button pliers generally followed the King design, as for example the Vaughan & Bushnell Button's Pattern Pliers and Utica Early Button's Pattern Pliers. (Later Utica Button's Pattern pliers used a novel design with two angled slots between the jaws.)

Kraeuter's use of the right-angle slot between the jaws is an important detail and will be helpful in identifying Kraeuter's contract production.


Later 1841-8 8 Inch Button's Pattern Pliers

This next figure shows an example of the later construction of the model 1841 pliers.

[Later Kraeuter 1841-8 8 Inch Button's Pattern Pliers]
Fig. 74. Later Kraeuter 1841-8 8 Inch Button's Pattern Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. Mid 1940s to 1950s.

Fig. 74 shows a later pair of Kraeuter 1841-8 8 inch "Button's Pattern" pliers, stamped with "Kraeuter" and the model number around the pivot, with "USA" in the center.

The overall length is 8.0 inches, and the finish is plain steel, with extensive pitting due to rust.

These pliers have plain handles, without the gripping pattern found on the earlier examples. There also are no markings on the underside of the handles.

The circular marking style indicates production from the mid 1940s or later.

The middle left inset shows a close-up of the cutting slot between the jaws. Note that on these later Button's pliers the slot is at an angle to the jaws.

The model 1841 pliers were part of Kraeuter's "Industrial" line from the mid 1940s onward.


1880-10½ Fencing Pliers with Button's Cutters

[Kraeuter 1880-10½ Fencing Pliers]
Fig. 75. Kraeuter 1880-10½ Fencing Pliers, with Insets for Side View, Construction, and Marking Detail, ca. 1910-1920.

Fig. 75 shows an early pair of Kraeuter 1880-10½ fencing pliers with Button's style cutters, stamped "Kraeuter & Co." and "Newark, N.J. U.S.A." near the pivot, and with "Forged Steel" forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 10.3 inches, and the finish is plain steel.


End Nippers


1850-5 "Giant Nipper" 5 Inch End Nippers

The next several figures show examples of Kraeuter's 1850 series of end nippers. Kraeuter offered end nippers in the 1850 and 1851 model series, which were identical except for the finish, which was black paint and "Kraeuter Finish", respectively.

[Kraeuter 1850-5 5 Inch End Nippers]
Fig. 76. Kraeuter 1850-5 "Giant Nipper" 5 Inch End Nippers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. Mid 1920s to Mid 1930s.

Fig. 76 shows a pair of Kraeuter 1850-5 5 inch end nipper pliers, somewhat amusingly marked as "Giant Nipper" near the pivot, and with "Kraeuter" and the model number on the back side. The handles have "Kraeuter, U.S.A." forged into the underside (see middle inset).

The overall length is 5.5 inches, and the finish is black paint.

The top inset illustrates the Kraeuter "Don't Slip" geometric gripping pattern on the handles. This pattern was registered as design patent #D46,682, issued to A.A. Kraeuter in 1914.

The "Kraeuter U.S.A." marking suggests production from the mid 1920s to mid 1930s.


1850-6 "Giant Nipper" 6 Inch End Nippers

[Kraeuter 1850-6 Giant Nipper 6 Inch End Nippers]
Fig. 77. Kraeuter 1850-6 "Giant Nipper" 6 Inch End Nippers, with Insets for Side View and Back Side Detail, ca. Mid 1920s to Late 1930s.

Fig. 77 shows a pair of Kraeuter 1850-6 6 inch end nippers, stamped with "Kraeuter" and the model number near the pivot, with "Giant Nipper" on the back side. The handles are also marked with "Kraeuter U.S.A." forged into the underside.

The overall length is 6.4 inches. The finish is plain steel, with extensive pitting due to rust.

The top inset illustrates the Kraeuter "Don't Slip" geometric gripping pattern on the handles. This pattern was registered as design patent #D46,682, issued to A.A. Kraeuter in 1914.

The "Kraeuter U.S.A." marking suggests production from the mid 1920s to mid 1930s.


1850-7 "Giant Nipper" 7 Inch End Nippers

The next figures show two generations of the 1850-7 end nippers.

[Kraeuter 1850-7 Giant Nipper 7 Inch End Nippers]
Fig. 78. Kraeuter 1850-7 "Giant Nipper" 7 Inch End Nippers, with Insets for Side View and Back Side Detail, ca. 1910 to 1920.

Fig. 78 shows an earlier pair of Kraeuter 1850-7 7 inch end nippers, stamped with "Giant Nipper" near the pivot, with "Kraeuter & Co." and "Newark N.J. U.S.A." on the back side (see middle inset). The handles are also marked with "Forged Steel" forged into the underside.

The overall length is 6.9 inches, and the finish is plain steel with traces of black paint.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the "Dimple-Diamond" gripping pattern on the handles.

[Kraeuter 1850-7 Giant Nipper 7 Inch End Nippers]
Fig. 79. Kraeuter 1850-7 "Giant Nipper" 7 Inch End Nippers, with Insets for Side View and Back Side Detail, ca. Early to Mid 1920s.

Fig. 79 shows a somewhat later pair of Kraeuter 1850-7 7 inch end nippers, stamped with "Giant Nipper" near the pivot, with "Kraeuter & Co." and "Newark, N.J. U.S.A." on the back side (see middle inset). The handles are marked with "Kraeuter U.S.A." forged into the underside.

The overall length is 7.1 inches, and the finish is plain steel with traces of black paint.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the "Don't Slip" gripping pattern on the handles.

These pliers have an unusual combination of markings, with both "Newark, N.J." stamped on the side and "Kraeuter U.S.A." forged into the handles. Previously we had thought that the Newark marking had been discontinued before the "Kraeuter U.S.A." marking was adopted, but this example shows that there was some overlap.


1850-7 "Supreme Nipper" 7 Inch End Nippers

[Kraeuter 1850-7 Supreme Nipper 7 Inch End Nippers]
Fig. 80. Kraeuter 1850-7 "Supreme" 7 Inch End Nippers, with Insets for Side View and Back Side Detail, ca. Late 1930s to Mid 1940s.

Fig. 80 shows a later pair of Kraeuter 1850-7 "Supreme" 7 inch end nippers, stamped with "Supreme Nipper" near the pivot, with "Kraeuter" and the model number on the back side (see middle inset).

The handles have a smooth underside with a stamped "9" digit.

The overall length is 7.0 inches, and the finish is plain steel with some remaining black paint.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the "Don't Slip" gripping pattern on the handles.

The "Supreme" marking on these model 1850 pliers is somewhat unexpected, as it was the similar model 1851 nippers that were given the "Supreme" designation in the 1946 catalog. The models 1850 and 1851 nippers differ only in the finish though, so possibly this example was just mismarked.


1850-7 7 Inch End Nippers

[Kraeuter 1850-7 End Nippers]
Fig. 81. Kraeuter 1850-7 7 Inch End Nippers, with Inset for Jaw Detail, ca. Mid 1940s to 1950s.

Fig. 81 shows a later pair of Kraeuter 1850-7 7 inch end nippers, stamped with "Kraeuter" and the model number in a circle, with "USA" in the center.

The overall length is 7.1 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The circular marking style indicates production in the mid 1940s or later.

The model 1850 pliers were part of Kraeuter's "Industrial" line from 1946 onward.


1851-5 "Giant Nipper" 5 Inch End Nippers

The 1851 end nipper models were identical to the 1850 series except for the "Kraeuter Finish", which the catalogs described as polished steel with black oxide for the knurled areas.

[Kraeuter 1851-5 5 Inch End Nippers]
Fig. 82. Kraeuter 1851-5 "Giant Nipper" 5 Inch End Nippers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. Mid 1920s to Mid 1930s.

Fig. 82 shows an early pair of Kraeuter 1851-5 "Giant Nipper" 5 inch end nipper, marked with "Kraeuter USA" and the model number on the back side, and with "Kraeuter, U.S.A." forged into the underside (see middle inset).

The overall length is 5.5 inches, and the finish is polished steel, now darkened with the effects of age and rust.

The model 1850 and model 1851 nippers were identical except for the finish, which was black paint and the "Kraeuter" finish, respectively. The catalog described the Kraeuter finish as polished steel with black oxide for the knurled areas.

The "Kraeuter U.S.A." marking suggests production from the mid 1920s to mid 1930s.


1851-7 "Giant Nipper" 7 Inch End Nippers

[Kraeuter 1851-7 Giant Nipper 7 Inch End Nippers]
Fig. 83. Kraeuter 1851-7 "Giant Nipper" 7 Inch End Nippers, with Insets for Side View and Back Side Detail, ca. Mid 1920s to Mid 1930s.

Fig. 83 shows a pair of Kraeuter 1851-7 7 inch end nippers, stamped with "Giant Nipper" near the pivot, with "Kraeuter USA" and the model number on the back side (see lower inset). The handles are also marked with "Kraeuter U.S.A." forged into the underside.

The overall length is 6.9 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the Kraeuter "Don't Slip" geometric gripping pattern on the handles. This pattern was registered as design patent #D46,682, issued to A.A. Kraeuter in 1914.

The "Kraeuter U.S.A." marking suggests production from the mid 1920s to mid 1930s.


Diagonal Cutters


2601-5 5 Inch Diagonal Cutters

[Kraeuter 2601-5 5 Inch Diagonal Cutters]
Fig. 84. Kraeuter 2601-5 5 Inch Diagonal Cutters, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. Mid 1920s to Mid 1930s.

Fig. 84 shows a pair of Kraeuter 2601-5 5 inch diagonal cutters, stamped with "Kraeuter" and "USA" across the pivot, with "Kraeuter U.S.A." forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 5.0 inches, and the finish is black oxide.

The top inset illustrates the Kraeuter "Don't Slip" geometric gripping pattern on the handles. This pattern was registered as design patent #D46,682, issued to A.A. Kraeuter in 1914.

The "Kraeuter U.S.A." marking suggests production from the mid 1920s to mid 1930s.


2601-6 6 Inch Diagonal Cutters

[Kraeuter 2601-6 6 Inch Diagonal Cutters]
Fig. 85. Kraeuter 2601-6 6 Inch Diagonal Cutters, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. Mid 1920s to Late 1930s.

Fig. 85 shows a pair of Kraeuter 2601-6 6 inch diagonal cutters, stamped with "Kraeuter" and the model number across the pivot, with "Kraeuter U.S.A." forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 6.1 inches, and the finish is black oxide.

The top inset illustrates the Kraeuter "Don't Slip" geometric gripping pattern on the handles. This pattern was registered as design patent #D46,682, issued to A.A. Kraeuter in 1914.

The "Kraeuter U.S.A." marking suggests production from the mid 1920s to mid 1930s.


4501-4½ 4.5 Inch Diagonal Cutters

[Kraeuter 4501-4½ Diagonal Cutters]
Fig. 86. Kraeuter 4501-4½ Diagonal Cutters, with Inset for Side View, ca. Mid 1940s to 1950s.

Fig. 86 shows a pair of Kraeuter 4501-4½ diagonal cutting pliers, stamped with "Kraeuter" and the model number around the pivot, with "USA" across the center.

The overall length is 4.7 inches, and the finish is black oxide.

The circular marking style indicates production from 1946 onward.

The model 4501 diagonal cutting pliers were listed as early as the 1939 catalog, and by 1946 were part of the "Industrial" line established by Kraeuter in the mid 1940s.


4501-6 Diagonal Cutters

[Kraeuter 4501-6 Diagonal Cutters]
Fig. 87. Kraeuter 4501-6 Diagonal Cutters, with Inset for Side View, ca. Mid 1940s to 1950s.

Fig. 87 shows a pair of Kraeuter 4501-6 diagonal cutting pliers, stamped with "Kraeuter" and the model number around the pivot, with "USA" across the center.

The overall length is 6.3 inches, and the finish is black oxide.

The circular marking style indicates production from 1946 onward.

The model 4501 diagonal cutting pliers were listed as early as the 1939 catalog, and by 1946 were part of the "Industrial" line established by Kraeuter in the mid 1940s.


2611-6½ 6.5 Inch Heavy-Duty Diagonal Cutters

[Kraeuter 2611-6½ 6.5 Inch Diagonal Cutters]
Fig. 88. Kraeuter 2611-6½ 6.5 Inch Heavy-Duty Diagonal Cutters, with Insets for Back Side, Side View, and Marking Detail, ca. Mid 1920s to 1933.

Fig. 88 shows a pair of Kraeuter 2611-6½ heavy-duty diagonal cutting pliers, stamped with "Kraeuter" and the model number across the pivot, and with "Kraeuter U.S.A." forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 6.7 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the "Don't Slip" gripping pattern on the handles.

The model 2611 pliers were not listed in the 1934 catalog, having apparently been superseded by the similar model 4611 pliers.


Round-Nose, Flat-Nose, and Needlenose Pliers


1611-5 5 Inch Round Nose Pliers

[Kraeuter 1611-5 5 Inch Needlenose Pliers]
Fig. 89A. Kraeuter 1611-5 5 Inch Round Nose Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. Mid 1920s to Mid 1930s.

Fig. 89A shows a pair of Kraeuter 1611-5 5 inch round nose pliers, stamped with "Kraeuter" and the model number across the pivot, and with "Kraeuter U.S.A." forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 5.2 inches, and the finish is polished steel.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the "Don't Slip" gripping pattern on the handles.

The "Kraeuter U.S.A." marking suggests production from the mid 1920s to mid 1930s.


1611-6 6 Inch Round Nose Pliers

[Kraeuter 1611-6 6 Inch Needlenose Pliers]
Fig. 89B. Kraeuter 1611-6 6 Inch Round Nose Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1910-1920.

Fig. 89B shows an early pair of Kraeuter 1611-6 6 inch round nose pliers, stamped with "Kraeuter & Co." and "Newark, N.J. U.S.A." near the pivot, and with "Forged Steel" forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 6.1 inches, and the finish is polished steel.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the "Dimple-Diamond" gripping pattern on the handles. This was the earliest handle pattern used by Kraeuter.

The dimpled gripping pattern and "Newark" marking suggest production in the range 1910-1920.


1621-6 6 Inch Long Needlenose Pliers

[Kraeuter 1621-6 6 Inch Needlenose Pliers]
Fig. 90. Kraeuter 1621-6 6 Inch Needlenose Pliers, with Inset for Side View, ca. Mid 1940s to 1950s.

Fig. 90 shows a pair of Kraeuter 1621-6 6 inch long needlenose pliers, stamped with "Kraeuter" and the model number around the pivot, with "USA" across the center.

The overall length is 6.5 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The circular marking style indicates production from the mid 1940s or later.

The model 1621 pliers were part of Kraeuter's "Industrial" line from the mid 1940s onward.


1631-5½ 5.5 Inch Bent Needlenose Pliers

[Kraeuter 1631-5½ 5.5 Inch Bent Needlenose Pliers]
Fig. 91. Kraeuter 1631-5½ 5.5 Inch Bent Needlenose Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. Mid 1920s to Mid 1930s.

Fig. 91 shows a pair of Kraeuter 1631-5½ 5.5 inch bent needlenose pliers, stamped with "Kraeuter" and the model number across the pivot, with "Kraeuter U.S.A." forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 5.6 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The top inset illustrates the Kraeuter "Don't Slip" geometric gripping pattern on the handles. This pattern was registered as design patent #D46,682, issued to A.A. Kraeuter in 1914.

The "Kraeuter U.S.A." marking suggests production from the mid 1920s to mid 1930s.


1641-5 5 Inch Short Needlenose Pliers with Side Cutters

[Kraeuter 1641-5 5 Inch Short Needlenose Side-Cutting Pliers]
Fig. 92. Kraeuter 1641-5 5 Inch Short Needlenose Side-Cutting Pliers, with Inset for Back Side Detail, ca. Mid 1940s to 1950s.

Fig. 92 shows a pair of Kraeuter 1641-5 5 inch short needlenose pliers with side-cutters, stamped with "Kraeuter" and the model number around the pivot, with "USA" in the center. The back side is stamped "Kraeuter" and "Industrial" around the pivot.

The overall length is 5.5 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The circular marking style indicates production from the mid 1940s or later.

The model 1641 pliers were part of Kraeuter's "Industrial" line from the mid 1940s onward.


1661-6 6 Inch Needlenose Pliers with Side Cutters

[Kraeuter 1661-6 6 Inch Needlenose Side-Cutting Pliers]
Fig. 93. Kraeuter 1661-6 6 Inch Needlenose Side-Cutting Pliers, ca. Mid 1940s to 1950s.

Fig. 93 shows a pair of Kraeuter 1661-6 6 inch needlenose pliers with side-cutters, stamped with "Kraeuter" and the model number around the pivot, with "U.S.A." in the center.

The overall length is 6.3 inches, and the finish is black oxide.

The circular marking style indicates production from the mid 1940s or later. The model 1661 pliers were part of Kraeuter's "Industrial" line from the mid 1940s onward.


1671[-6] 6 Inch Needlenose Pliers

The next two figures show examples of the Kraeuter 1671 pliers.

[Kraeuter 1671-6 6 Inch Needlenose Pliers]
Fig. 94. Kraeuter 1671-6 6 Inch Needlenose Pliers, with Insets for Handle Pattern and Marking Detail, ca. Early 1920s.

Fig. 94 shows a pair of Kraeuter 1671-6 6 inch needlenose pliers, stamped with "Kraeuter" and "USA" across the pivot, with "Kraeuter U.S.A." forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 5.9 inches, and the finish is black oxide.

The upper inset shows the pattern forged into the handle, a dimpled field with a central diamond.

These pliers are unusual in retaining the "Dimple-Diamond" gripping pattern with the forged-in "Kraeuter U.S.A." marking.

[Kraeuter 1671 6 Inch Needlenose Pliers]
Fig. 95. Kraeuter 1671 6 Inch Needlenose Pliers, with Insets for Handle Pattern and Marking Detail, ca. Mid 1940s to 1950s.

Fig. 95 shows a later pair of Kraeuter 1671 6 inch needlenose pliers, stamped "Kraeuter" and "USA" around the pivot.

The overall length is 6.0 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The circular marking style indicates production from the mid 1940s or later. The model 1671 pliers were part of Kraeuter's "Industrial" line from the mid 1940s onward.


1691-6 6 Inch Needlenose Pliers

[Kraeuter 1691-6 6 Inch Needlenose Pliers]
Fig. 96. Kraeuter 1691-6 6 Inch Needlenose Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. Mid 1920s to Mid 1930s.

Fig. 96 shows a pair of Kraeuter 1691-6 6 inch needlenose pliers, stamped with "Kraeuter" and "USA" and the model number across the pivot, and with "Kraeuter U.S.A." forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 6.0 inches, and the finish is polished steel.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the "Don't Slip" gripping pattern forged into the handles.

The "Kraeuter U.S.A." marking suggests production from the mid 1920s to mid 1930s.


1711-5 Long-Nose Pliers

[Kraeuter 1711-5 5 Inch Long-Nose Side-Cutting Pliers]
Fig. 97. Kraeuter 1711-5 5 Inch Long-Nose Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1910 to 1920.

Fig. 97 shows a pair of Kraeuter 1711-5 5 inch long-nose pliers, marked with "Kraeuter & Co." and "Newark, N.J. U.S.A." stamped across the pivot, with "Forged Steel" forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 5.3 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the "Dimple-Diamond" gripping pattern on the handles. This was the earliest handle pattern used by Kraeuter.

The inside of the handles are fitted with posts apparently used to hold a spring, but the spring was missing when the tool was acquired.


1721-6 6 Inch Long-Nose Pliers with Side Cutters

[Kraeuter 1721-6 6 Inch Long-Nose Side-Cutting Pliers]
Fig. 98. Kraeuter 1721-6 6 Inch Long-Nose Side-Cutting Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. Mid 1920s to Mid 1930s.

Fig. 98 shows a pair of Kraeuter 1721-6 6 inch long nose side-cutting pliers, stamped "Kraeuter USA" near the pivot, and with "Kraeuter U.S.A." forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 5.9 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The "Kraeuter U.S.A." marking suggests production from the mid 1920s to mid 1930s.

This style of pliers has a flat wide tip and was recommended by the Kraeuter catalog for electrical work.


1771-7 7 Inch Extra Long Nose Pliers

The next several figures show examples of the model 1771 pliers spanning two generations of production.

[Kraeuter 1771-7 7 Inch Extra Long Nose Pliers]
Fig. 99. Kraeuter 1771-7 7 Inch Extra Long Nose Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. Mid 1920s to Mid 1930s.

Fig. 99 shows a pair of Kraeuter 1771-7 7 inch extra long nose pliers, stamped "Kraeuter USA" with the model number across the pivot, with "Kraeuter U.S.A." forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 6.7 inches, although the tip may have been shortened slightly by grinding. The finish is plain steel with some pitting due to rust, but the catalog lists the original finish as "Blue Temper".

The upper inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the "Don't Slip" pattern on the handles.

The "Kraeuter U.S.A." marking suggests production from the mid 1920s to mid 1930s.

[Kraeuter 1771-7 7 Inch Extra Long Nose Pliers]
Fig. 100. Kraeuter 1771-7 7 Inch Extra Long Nose Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. Mid 1920s to Mid 1930s.

Fig. 100 shows another similar pair of Kraeuter 1771-7 7 inch extra long nose pliers, stamped with "Kraeuter" and the model number across the pivot, with "Kraeuter U.S.A." forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 6.8 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The upper inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the "Don't Slip" gripping pattern on the handles.

The "Kraeuter U.S.A." marking suggests production from the mid 1920s to mid 1930s.

[Kraeuter 1771-7 7 Inch Extra Long Nose Pliers]
Fig. 101. Kraeuter 1771-7 7 Inch Extra Long Nose Pliers, with Inset for Side View, ca. Mid 1940s to 1950s.

Fig. 101 shows a later pair of Kraeuter 1771-7 7 inch extra long nose pliers, stamped with "Kraeuter" and the model number around the pivot, with "USA" across the center.

The overall length is 7.1 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the smooth handles found in later production of this model.

The circular marking style indicates production from the mid 1940s or later. The model 1771 pliers were part of Kraeuter's "Industrial" line from the mid 1940s onward.


1591-4½ 4.5 Inch Milliner's Flat-Nose Pliers with Side Cutters

[Kraeuter 1591-4½ 4.5 Inch Milliner's Flat-Nose Side-Cutting Pliers]
Fig. 102. Kraeuter 1591-4½ 4.5 Inch Milliner's Flat-Nose Side-Cutting Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1910-1920.

Fig. 102 shows a pair of Kraeuter 1591-4½ 4.5 inch Milliner's flat-nose side-cutting pliers, stamped with "Kraeuter" and "Newark, N.J. U.S.A." near the pivot, and with "Forged Steel" forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 4.4 inches, and the finish is polished steel.

The handles have a dimpled pattern with a central raised diamond, and one handle is drilled for a hanging loop, as shown in the lower inset.


1601-4 4 Inch Flat-Nose Pliers

The model 1601 flat-nose pliers were available in the five sizes 4, 4.5, 5, 5.5, and 6 inches.

[Kraeuter 1601-4 4 Inch Flat-Nose Pliers]
Fig. 103. Kraeuter 1601-4 4 Inch Flat-Nose Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1910-1920.

Fig. 103 shows a diminutive pair of Kraeuter 1601-4 4 inch flat-nose pliers, stamped with "Kraeuter" and "Newark, N.J. U.S.A." near the pivot, and with "Forged Steel" forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 4.0 inches, and the finish is polished steel with black oxide.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the dimpled gripping pattern with a central raised diamond.

The model 1601 pliers are similar to the model 1591 pliers, but without the side-cutting edges.


1601-4½ 4.5 Inch Flat-Nose Pliers

[Kraeuter 1601-4½ 4.5 Inch Flat-Nose Pliers]
Fig. 104. Kraeuter 1601-4½ 4.5 Inch Flat-Nose Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1910-1920.

Fig. 104 shows a pair of Kraeuter 1601-4½ 4.5 inch flat-nose pliers, stamped with "Kraeuter" and "Newark, N.J. U.S.A." near the pivot, and with "Forged Steel" forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 4.5 inches, and the finish is polished steel with some nickel plating remaining.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the dimpled gripping pattern with a central raised diamond.


1741-6 6 Inch Long Flat-Nose Pliers

[Kraeuter 1741-6 6 Inch Long Flat-Nose Pliers]
Fig. 105. Kraeuter 1741-6 6 Inch Long Flat-Nose Pliers, with Inset for Side View, ca. Mid 1940s to 1950s.

Fig. 105 shows a pair of Kraeuter 1741-6 6 inch flat-nose pliers, marked with "Kraeuter" and the model number around the pivot, with "USA" across the center.

The overall length is 6.1 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The circular marking style indicates production from the mid 1940s or later. The model 1741 pliers were part of Kraeuter's "Industrial" line from the mid 1940s onward.


Kraeuter 1751-6 6 Inch Long Flat-Nose Pliers with Side Cutters

[Kraeuter 1751-6 6 Inch Long Flat-Nose Side-Cutting Pliers]
Fig. 106. Kraeuter 1751-6 6 Inch Long Flat-Nose Side-Cutting Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Back Side Detail, ca. Mid 1940s to 1950s.

Fig. 106 shows a pair of Kraeuter 1751-6 6 inch long flat-nose pliers with side cutters, stamped with "Kraeuter" and the model number around the pivot, with "USA" across the center. The back side is stamped with "Kraeuter" and "Industrial" around the pivot.

The overall length is 6.1 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The circular marking style indicates production from the mid 1940s or later. The model 1751 pliers were part of Kraeuter's "Industrial" line from the mid 1940s onward.


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